Study Shows Once and For All That Vaccines Don’t Cause Autism


Study Shows Once and For All That Vaccines Don't Cause Autism

The largest study ever into vaccinnations and autism determined there is no link between the two, even if the child has a high risk of developing the condition.

In a shock twist, researchers actually discovered that unvaccinated children are more likely to be diagnosed with the autism than those who were innoculated – 17% more likely, in fact.

The study, which collated data from 650,000 children, found no connection between the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine and the developmental disorder, which impacts how sufferers communicate and interact with others.

Undertaken by a group of Danish scientists, the experiment focused on children born in Denmark between 1999 and 2010.

Published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, the study also discovered that children with siblings suffering from ASD were more seven times more likely to develop the condition themselves, and that males were four times more likely to be diagnosed than females.

Published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, the study also discovered that children with siblings suffering from ASD were more seven times more likely to develop the condition themselves, and that males were four times more likely to be diagnosed than females.

Study Shows Once and For All That Vaccines Don't Cause Autism

The authors, from Copenhagen’s Statens Serum Institut, concluded: “The study strongly supports that MMR vaccination does not increase the risk for autism, does not trigger autism in susceptible children, and is not associated with clustering of autism cases after vaccination.”

While lead author Dr Anders Hvidd told Reuters: “Parents should not skip the vaccine out of fear for autism.

“The dangers of not vaccinating includes a resurgence in measles which we are seeing signs of today in the form of outbreaks.”

The idea that the MMR vaccination causes autism can be traced back to a 1998 paper by Andrew Wakefield. In his study, which was based on only 12 children, Wakefield claimed that their was a link to autism and the MMR jab. However, it was later discovered that his results were fake, and as a result he was banned from practising medicine.

Still, the myth persists, and is being partially blamed for a 30% rise in measles cases. As a result, the World Health Organisation has listed anti-vaxxers as one of the biggest threat to global health in 2019.

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Sophie Lloyd

Sophie is a cute feminist butterfly navigating the world one kitty meme at a time, or at least that’s how her best friend described her when she asked for help writing this bio. She likes cheese and one day hopes to be the proud owner of a corgi. For more of her random ramblings, follow her on Twitter/Instagram @_sophofbread.

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