Mike Gundy Rants On Twitter About NCAA Football Rule Changes


Mike Gundy twitter rant about NCAA rule changes is priceless

Oklahoma State football coach Mike Gundy is not happy about rule changes to his beloved NCAA sport. He is so upset, in fact, he turned to Twitter to voice his frustration Thursday.

The NCAA rules committee recently proposed a few changes for the 2014 football season. One of the rules would allow a defensive substitution within the first 10 seconds of the 40-second play clock. The only time this could not happen is the final two minutes of each half.

Under the rule, if an offense were to snap the ball before the play clock hit 29 seconds, they would be flagged for a five-yard delay of game penalty.

Mike Gundy runs a fast-paced offense at Oklahoma, and he is not happy about a rule possibly slowing down the game. After hearing about the new rule, he decided the best approach was to let the twitterverse know his displeasure.

Gundy’s rant probably won’t make a difference on whether the rule is accepted or not. He is not the only coach upset with the proposal, though. Arizona head coach Rich Rodriguez and Mississippi’s Rich Freeze are in Gundy’s endzone on the issue.

Mike Gundy and his coaching counterparts have every reason to upset. The new rule would slow down offenses that have made coaches careers. What would have happened with Chip Kelly if he had been forced to wait 10 seconds before hiking the ball?

[Photo Credit: KT King]


Scott Croker

Scott Croker grew up writing short stories and watching sports. It was only fate his two loves would combine into a life of sports writing. He grew up in the great sports city of San Francisco and currently resides in LA, which is just a football team away from being complete. As he has gotten older he has realized that there is not much more in life he needs to be happy than a TV and laptop, although going to games is nice too.

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