Social Media Profiles Can Sabotage Your Love Life


social media profiles on Facebook and Twitter, damaging to potential relationships

Your online profile may be killing your love life. And no I don’t mean your online dating profile. I mean your social media profiles on Facebook and Twitter could be inadvertently sabotaging your chances with Mr. Right, according to AVG research.

AVG Technologies Australia/New Zealand conducted an unscientific but interesting snapshot survey about how our internet connected lifestyles impact relationships.

They determined more than a third of single men surveyed use social media to spy on would-be partners.

The NZ Herald reports, 35 percent of the 1,098 men surveyed across New Zealand, Australia, and the Pacific Islands (20 percent of the 598 women respectfully) use Facebook and Twitter to check out would-be dates.

Of those, 65 percent of men admit to scoping out the “about” sections on social media profiles prior to going out with the person. And 15 percent confess they cancelled dates because of something posted on Facebook or Twitter.

Just for interest, per AVG’s Connected Males survey, 6.5 percent said they’d used email to break up with someone.

Social media profiles are seen by friends, acquaintances, strangers, and potential employers alike. Failing to see the potential consequences, people will indiscriminately over-share about some wild weekend out of town or post risky selfies. But what you post on your Facebook and Twitter profiles may explain why you are still single, as potential suitors are also spying through your social media profiles.

The online security experts recommend taking a moment to carefully reconsider posting certain material and information on social media profiles, as well as reassess your privacy settings.

Think before you click.

The same can be said with smart phone content, as based on the survey nearly 40 percent of people fail to use device passwords. Of the 75 percent of respondents who had been in long term relationships, men were 2.5 times more likely to have inappropriate content on their phones – deemed not suitable for a curious, underage eyes.

AVG experts’ further urge, people should be mindful of what they download onto their personal smartphones and devices as that inappropriate or personal content can be easily hacked.

[Image: •Cuentosdeunaimbecila•]


Megan Charles

Megan Charles is a general news and health-focus writer with a background in medicine and biotechnology. Currently she is contributing to Social News Daily and Whole Woman Health. Former credits include Indyposted, The Daily Globe, and The Inquisitr.

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